Interviews

Interviews on Doxxing and Security featuring the influencers Panama, Nik Patel, TeddyCleps, Crypto Christopher Walken, The Crypto Monk and Mocho

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Here are the interviews from the article Doxxing – The Ultimate Crypto Taboo? with multiple popular influencers from Crypto Twitter. You can find their handles and information throughout if you wish to follow them.

I first spoke with Panama (@Panama_TJ) who has been on Twitter since 2011 and has 41.7k followers.

S: You have a large following and have been in crypto since June 2011, what has been your decision never to doxx yourself to the public?

P: Initially I wanted to keep my persona anonymous due to my 9 to 5. I didn’t want my co-workers to know I was in CT, but the more I read about people getting mugged for being flashy about owning crypto (not that I’m flashy) the more paranoid I was to keep a layer of protection from a possible threat to me or my loved ones. Panama is safe in general but being as overly bullish I am on Bitcoin and crypto in general, anybody that holds it would for sure be more likely to suffer some sort of attempt of robbery, same as politicians here, thieves hustle hard.

S: Do you think that the higher your follower account on twitter the more risk there is of being hacked or worse?

P: Of course, the bigger the following count, the bigger the target you become.

S: Do you believe it’s important for the Crypto community that you have the decision to remain anonymous if chosen, unlike other traditional social media communities?

P:It is of utmost importance to me personally, it might not be for the rest of the community. Influencers need to decide the balance they want, keep it “anon”, build reputation slowly. Or be a IRL person, dox yourself and get more street cred by being “real”.

You can get in touch with Panama on his site here

I then spoke with Nik Patel (@cointradernik) who is fully doxxed. Nik has been on Twitter since 2014 and has 69.7k followers. He was also famously hacked as I mentioned earlier:

S: What made you decide to Doxx yourself as opposed to remain anonymous behind an avi?

N: I had always been semi-doxxed as it was, other than during the first 6 months or so that I was in the space (when I had the username @tenaciouscrypto). After that, I changed it to daytradernik and adopted a Leicester City photo, so that would’ve narrowed down who I was a great deal anyway. Then, when I returned to trading crypto in Jan ‘17, I decided to just fully doxx because I figured if anyone really wanted to find out who I was, it wasn’t going to be a difficult task as it was. Plus I think it generates some level of commitment to authenticity that isn’t possible when you remain anonymous.

S: Did/do you have to make extra precautions for your coins and holdings knowing you have some personal information out in public?

N: Well, despite having been in the space for years prior to fully doxxing, and having thought I had taken necessary precautions, I was remotely hacked in October 2017 and lost around two-thirds of my entire altcoin portfolio. This was a wake-up call. But I don’t think it was a symptom of being public, but more one of incompetence on my end.

S: Do you believe that the higher your follower count, the more risk there is of being hacked?

N: I don’t think that’s necessarily true; though, the higher your follower count the more publicly visible you are,  so I could see how you could potentially become more of a target. I think the risk is more strongly related to the level of caution you exhibit regarding profits. Those who flaunt their wealth all over social media tend to be the ones who get targeted.

S: Do you think it’s important for the Crypto community that you have the decision to remain anonymous if chosen, unlike other traditional social media communities

N: I think privacy and anonymity is something of critical importance to this community. And I think that though I don’t personally choose to exercise that right, there are a huge number of individuals in the community who require it in order to comfortably participate, and I think that’s important.

Nik has a best selling book on Amazon which covers aspects of security you can find here

Next I spoke with Teddy Cleps aka Crypto Freak (@teddycleps) who has been doxxed since he created his account. He posts videos and trading setups as well as running a telegram channel and discord. He joined in 2017 and has 12.1k followers. He had the following to say regarding being doxxed and security:

“I created this account not aware of how big the crypto community actually was – I simply wanted to document my Crypto journey so i simply created an account with my name and surname and shared a ton of charts. I didn’t even know that people were using cartoons/@virtual avatars.

Once I got to understand the community (and realised that everyone was a cartoon character) I knew for a fact that having my name and surname was a “strength” as it added a layer of transparency to my account.

I’m not a scammer, nor do I have anything to hide, so I have no reason to be hidden behind a cartoon.

However this does have a security drawback – I have an email dedicated for spam and people have tried to access it endless times.

So if you want to go out with no avatar make sure to always have very strong security measures.”

You can catch Teddy for further discussions on his Telegram here.

Crypto Christopher Walken (@cryptochrisw) is highly revered in the community and has built up his following through his dedication and passion to mining. He has been on Twitter since 2018 and has 12.1k followers. He started his account hidden behind an avatar but made the decision to doxx when his following stated to grow. I asked him about this below:

“So I decided to dox for 2 reasons –

1.  Trust Factor.  

Granted I feel that people already trusted me but putting a face to an account adds a different layer.

2. Business Opportunities:

I had so many YouTube offers that I felt it was time. Also being involved with actual companies now, big money investors aren’t going to want to work with someone hiding behind a fake avatar.  At this point i’m not worried about being hacked – I think i was just overly cautious because of Mt.Gox. However all of my coins are safely locked away except for small stacks I’m trading”

This prompted the following question:

S: So do you think before mainstream adoption can occur there has to be a serious look at how our coins and holdings are protected, if people have to go to extreme lengths just to reveal their identity to the community?

C: It’s not even that but ease of use is the worst part.  I don’t think the normal population cares about having to KYC.  The problem is using and purchasing Crypto. I deal with people on a daily basis that barely know how to use a computer trying to get into mining. There are so many people that still aren’t tech savvy enough to do this.  Buying on coinbase then sending to other exchanges to buy altcoins. Using a hardware wallet. All while not inputting incorrect addresses, or people not writing down their private key. There has to be an easier way.

Chris is currently the Community Manager for Honey Miner and Head of Business Development for BitMatrix Mining

The Crypto Monk (@thecryptomonk) has been on Twitter since 2012 and has amassed a following of 37.8k. He is renowned for his charting skills and technical analysis.

S: Do you believe that the higher your follower account on twitter the more risk there is of being hacked if you release any personal information?

M: Showing off online has never been something my kind of thing. It’s obviously dangerous since you expose yourself to scammers and greedy thieves. Also it’s not part of my personality. I’m not here to brag about my gains or losses. I’m here to share some content that people could find useful.

Having a large audience increase your exposure to shady people and thus puts you in a sensitive position. You have to be very careful with what you share.

S: Do you have any views on whether Crypto would potentially be taken more seriously if there were more real identities and less anon avi’s?

M: I don’t think that having anonymous people « representing » the community on Twitter is a bad thing. Moreover I have never really considered myself as an « influencer ». All i do is sharing my views on the market and charts. The bigger part of the adoption process is made outside CT which is obviously an echo chamber.

It might change in the future but i don’t believe that the impact we have on the crypto market is significant especially in a bear market.

S: Do you believe it’s important for the Crypto community that you have the decision to remain anonymous if chosen, unlike other traditional social media communities

M: I wouldn’t trade my privacy for clout. If people want to stay anonymous or not they should have the choice to do it. I’m not an ambassador of anything so there is no contract forcing me to doxx myself.

S: Do you believe you would have had more potential business opportunities in this space if you revealed your identity?

M: That’s possible. I guess that companies would rather work with «doxxed  influencers » than cartoon avatars but on CT it’s hard to find people revealing their identity.

I receive a ton of offers on a daily basis and i haven’t really found something interesting enough to collaborate.

I’m not here to take any single opportunity and make money off it. If it’s worth it, i would never compromise my reputation or my ethic.

Monk is the co-host of the MoonSoon Podcast and you can find him on Medium here

Finally I spoke with Crypto Mocho (@cryptomocho) who is arguably the most recognised influencer of Crypto Twitter. Mocho is the advisor to many projects and has a following of 123k.

S: You have a large following, one of the largest in twitter and have been a popular figure in crypto for a long time now, what’s been your decision never to doxx yourself to the public?  

M: I don’t need to reveal my identity to be taken more seriously,  also I really think that the crypto trader investors need to muv to some anon semidectral plataform we dont need to stay in a place where  they can ban or shadow ban ant any moment coz they dont like your posts/anwers/post/coments i dotn doxx myselfe coz i love to stay anon.

S: Do you believe that the higher your follower account on Twitter the more risk there is of being hacked if you release any personal information?

M: the risck is always there thos crypto space is all about big tech guys that are way up the average lavel so yes all walys need to play safe is part of the risck managment always protect like to use condom better use it always

S: Do you believe it’s important for the Crypto community that you have the decision to remain anonymous if chosen, unlike other traditional social media communities?

M: when i will get asked to doxx that tha dey i will goo full into the shadow anon is a right is not a cryme    there will be always a pice of internet land for us the crypto guys like us that gonna be anon and happy forever cheers.

You can follow Mocho on twitter at his account here.

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Alex Libertas
Alex is the Founder of The Daily Chain and has been in the space for just over two years. Fascinated by the community and everything that blockchain has to offer, Alex dedicated himself to creating content and contributing back to the industry.

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